The term “distracted driving” is one that seems to appear more and more often pertaining to cell phones. And it’s true — they can be very distracting, even contributing to a phenomenon now known as “distracted walking” that seems to be killing an increasing number of pedestrians. But a close look at the facts reveals that our vigilance behind the wheel needs to extend further than just resisting the pull of our smartphones. Here are three other main causes of distracted driving and recommendations for dealing with them. 1. Passengers A recent study shows that for teens, friends can be even more dangerous than cell phones. The highest percentage of crashes by teenage drivers, fifteen percent, was caused by talking to passengers. The use of cell phones accounted for twelve percent. It’s still dangerous, but not as dangerous as talking to friends. For parents, the great danger is trying to take care of children while driving. In one survey of moms with small children, over half admitted to turning around while driving to help their child with something. Stay safer while driving with passengers with these tips: Parents should always pull off the road before turning around, and (unless it’s an emergency, i.e. the child is choking on something) should always find a suitable parking area in which to do so. Teenagers need to be careful how many friends ride with them at once, keep their eyes on the road while conversing, and ask all passengers to be considerate and keep an eye out for traffic dangers. 2. Navigation Inputting addresses into a GPS is the most severe navigational distraction, but it’s also difficult to watch the road while reading a map or even while following written directions. So how can you get to a new place safely? If you don’t have time to memorize the directions beforehand (and who does?) you can try one of these options: Bring a passenger who agrees to serve as the map-reader. Pre-program your GPS before heading out, and remind yourself not to make any changes in the route without pulling off the road into a parking lot first. If you don’t have a working GPS, make an audio recording of your written directions and play it back while driving so you can keep your eyes on the road. 3. Drowsiness Although about half of drivers realize that drowsy driving is very dangerous and nearly all admitted in a study that it is unacceptable behavior, over forty-five percent claimed to have done it at least once. But just how dangerous is it? Drowsy driving crashes have nearly as high a fatality rate as drunk driving crashes. In addition, about one-fifth of all fatal crashes (plus...